Lusting For Covers (282) The Bride Takes A Groom

Lusting for Covers is a weekly meme, held on Sunday, that allows bloggers to share their current cover obsession with fellow book lovers.

This meme is hosted by TBQ @ TBQ’s Book Palace.

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Lisa Berne’s Penhallow Dynasty continues with a pair of star-crossed childhood friends who meet again years later—and find love where they least expect it…

Katherine Brooke may be a fabulously wealthy heiress, but she’s trapped, a pawn in her parents’ ruthless game to marry her into the nobility. Then Captain Hugo Penhallow—so charming, as handsome as a Greek god—comes into her life once more, and suddenly she sees a chance to be free.

As a Penhallow, his is one of the highest names in the land, but still his family is facing ruin. So Katherine boldly proposes an exchange: his name for her money. But only if Hugo understands it’s merely a practical arrangement, and that she’s not surrendering herself entirely.

Back from eight years in America and determined to give his younger siblings a better life, Hugo agrees. He’s never fallen in love, so why not? Yet neither of them guesses that this marriage will become far, far more than they ever dreamed of.

Why so much to Lust over in The Bride Takes A Groom?

I simply adore this cover so much, this author has the BEST covers. They are so swoony and romantic and I love the soft toned colors being used.

About Lisa Berne

I read my first historical romance when I was fourteen. I remember it distinctly. It was Georgette Heyer’s effervescent Lady of Quality, which my mom had gotten from her book club. The jacket cover had this elegantly dressed lady in a ruffled yellow skirt, dainty little sandals, and a bonnet.

Despite being over 5,000 miles from Bath, England, and understanding very little of the period terminology, I was instantly captivated. A smart, capable, independent heroine. A clever, dashing, irresistible hero. Crackling repartee. Who knew that conversation could be so incredibly romantic?

I’ve read a lot of romance since then — and I mean a lot — but it’s Heyer who’s probably had the strongest influence on me. I’m thrilled to now be writing my own historical romances, and it’s with a respectful tip of my hat (a high-poke bonnet, of course) that I’ve set my first three books in the United Kingdom in 1811, just when the Regency era had officially begun.

When I’m not writing, I like to read (of course), bake (not to brag, but my chocolate-chip cookies are amazing), go to museums (all kinds, and in particular I highly recommend the Museum of Bad Art in Boston if you ever get a chance to visit it), and travel with my intrepid family.